The Busy Trap

If you live in America [or Europe of course] in the 21st century you’ve probably had to listen to a lot of people tell you how busy they are. It’s become the default response when you ask anyone how they’re doing: “Busy!” “So busy.” “Crazy busy.” It is, pretty obviously, a boast disguised as a complaint. And the stock response is a kind of congratulation: “That’s a good problem to have,” or “Better than the opposite.”

busyness

 

Great opener for an awesome article – because it´s more than true. I catch myself at least 3 times a day saying one of those phrases.

 

 

Tim Kreider wrote an article about “The Busy Trap” at NYTimes.com. He points out that the word “Busy” has mutated to a new buzzword. Everyone is busy in these days because they feel anxious and guilty when they aren´t either working or doing something to promote their work. People are feeling ashamed if they can´t say that they are busy. And at one point of “promoting busyness” there is the point of no return. Once we would start being not “so busy”, our picture of the perfect modern busyness-person could crumble.

“Busyness serves as a kind of existential reassurance, a hedge against emptiness; obviously your life cannot possibly be silly or trivial or meaningless if you are so busy, completely booked, in demand every hour of the day.”

Kreider´s whole article is an eye opening impulse to think about our daily life. He uses great examples to show us that through “busyness” we feel more important so that we promote our busyness wherever we can. But we don´t see the damage in our mindset, in our everyday life.

We should look after what we say, what we do and especially what we think day by day … before we get caught in the busy trap.

“The Busy Trap” – Definitely a must-read in these days!

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